BORA’s Downdraft Extractor Still Deserves Top Billing

 

One thing is certain, during lockdown pretty much all of us did a lot more cooking than usual. Even those who had never been interested in showing any chef credentials in the past, started experimenting with the odd bunch of ingredients. We all had a lot more time on our hands at home, so why not?

Remember the sourdough bread phase? It was difficult to ignore with thousands of Instagram and Facebook feeds showing us the latest attempts on a daily basis.

Regardless of whether it was bread, curries or casseroles that were cooked, the upshot is we were all using our ovens and hobs a lot more than normal. And this is why, here at Bryan Turner Kitchens we noticed a bigger demand than usual for our BORA intelligent extraction and handy hobs.

 

BORA partners for the past two years

 

We are proud to have been partnered with BORA for more than two years now. Their innovative downdraft extraction fan is a market leader when it comes to such technology. It may have been copied by other upmarket kitchen manufacturers (think Bosch, Siemens and Neff) but it is difficult – if not impossible - to beat the Bora’s excellence in terms of efficiency, reliability and sheer genius.

In fact, such is the effectiveness of the technology that there is no need to have an extraction hood in the kitchen at all. Not only does this free up more space, but it’s the perfect solution for a kitchen island hob.

 

Fresh air, low noise and an easy-clean solution

 

It means the cook – and anyone else in the kitchen at the time – can enjoy breathing in fresh air (rather than the smell of what is cooking on the hob at the time). They will also be able to hear themselves converse since the BORA downdraft extractor is also much quieter than most extractor fans on the market today.

Another bonus of the downdraft extractor fan is that it is also far easier to clean than the cumbersome overhead oven extractor.

 

How the Bora extractor works

 

It was engineer Willi Brukbauer who came up with the first BORA hob with downdraft extractor. “Huge extractor hoods obstructed views, people knocked into the corners and edges, and kitchen vapours were distributed around the room, falling on units and furnishings” says @Willibruckbauer. That was back in 2006. So effective was the method that today the principle (or mechanism) is exactly the same.

Rather than extracting the cooking vapours upwards into an overhead extractor, the BORA extractor draws the vapours downwards into the cooktop. It does this so quickly that the vapours aren’t given any opportunity to vent. Certainly, it is much quicker at the task than the upward extractor which has to wait until the vapours rise. With the downward extractor the vapours, of course, don’t get the opportunity to rise in the first place.

 

As a result, the effect is a kitchen or open plan living area that is free from cooking smells or steam, which makes for a much more pleasant environment for everyone around – not just whoever happens to be cooking at the time.